Yellow and Blue Family Tree Layout

Family Tree Scrapbook Layout
Family Tree Scrapbook Layout. Template designed by Devon Noel Lee
All embellishments are recolored from their original designer.

Once you have made a digital scrapbook featuring your family history, it's easier to work on another person's project. This year I'm working on a heritage album featuring my mother-in-law as the focal person. Shhh.. she's out of the country right now. Don't tell her how the project is coming along.

What's interesting is that with her living and her life history written and photos digitized, one would think that I could jump in with both feet and knock this baby out quickly. Yet her scrapbook has been on my to-do list for a few years now. Sure life with five superheroes to raise has busy seasons. Yet this book just would not get started. Finally, I decided to just do it. I mean, I tell you to create a scrapbook about your family history now. In fact, I made a video about it. (See the video below). And yet, I wasn't practicing what I was preaching.

Inspirational video from FamilyHistoryFanatics. Click to watch.

So, I started with the first layout every heritage scrapbook should have - a family tree. I chose the colors yellow and blue because they are my mother-in-law's favorite colors, though the shades might not be the exact preferences.

In the past, I have shared family trees that I created for my parents and my mother's parents. Each one was a little different and could have worked for this scrapbook, but I wanted to do something a little different. I didn't want to have a tree image be a part of the layout. I also wanted my mother-in-law at the top. Finally, I didn't want to use ovals for the photos, as I have incorporated in previous designs.

Once I arranged some boxes for the names. I used rectangles with rounded corners for the pictures. Then I used the line tool in Photoshop Elements to establish the connections between the generations. There is a principle in scrapbooking that everything should touch in some way. The lines achieved that design tip while demonstrating the genealogical relations. Hooray! Two for one.

Finally, after I arranged the photos in a linear fashion, I didn't like it. That is until I tilted the portraits of the couples a bit. This simple customization gave the tree a more casual, intimate feel.

For the background paper, I initially chose a yellow paper with a soft pattern that was in my digital stash. I didn't like the exact color the designer had chosen, so I removed the color using Photoshop Elements. I tried to recolor the paper to the yellow of my color scheme, and it never felt right. So, I just left the gray version of the pattern paper. It was neutral, and those colors (gray, white, black, tan) always work well in heritage scrapbooks with a pop of color across the page.

Finally, I added some embellishments in the upper left corner to draw your eye to the top of the page. One would think we would start at that corner because we read from left to right and from top to bottom. However, that row of photos at the lower part of the tree kept bringing the eye there while ignoring my mother-in-law at the top. The decorative corner finished the job and now I'm happy with the results.

What do you think? Would you change anything on the layout? Do you like it? Let me know in the comments section below.

In the meantime, it's time to do the other 19 pages for my mother-in-law's book.

Comments

  1. Lovely Devon. Let us know how she like it.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Lillian. She doesn't return until July. I really need to get a move on it to finish in time!

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  2. I like it but I would put a wider & not black, maybe dark blue or deep gold, frame around Betty.

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    Replies
    1. Gene. What a great tip. I'll give that a try.

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