Heritage Scrapbooking: Baby Girl Birth Layout

Do you have old photos, a baby book, and the story surrounding your birth or that of someone you love? If you do, you have the foundation for a great baby themed heritage scrapbook page.

Vintage Baby Scrapbook Layout
Birth: Paper and Elements from Correen Silke, Hello, Auntie

When crafting a heritage album about a specific person, it's important that your pages accomplish a number of things. Some of those tasks include: visually presenting the subject, uniting stories with photos, and keeping the focus on the content rather than the design. If you missed my post 9 Tips to Making a Heritage Album Someone Actually Wants to Read, you can see so ways to accomplish your goals.

Challenges for this layout

The challenges I had with creating this layout are numerous. I was given my baby book after I married. At the time, I was doing a lot of scanning and posting to the internet and thought it would be great to preserve my baby book. At the time, I was told to scan at 72 dpi. After the book was scanned, I did not preserve it. At the time, I felt I had it preserved and I was not worried.

Fast forward 10 years and I want to use portions of my baby book in my scrapbook. Scans and images that are large at 72 dpi do not often translate well on a 300 dpi page. The size you see on this layout of my baby bracelets and my mother's hand written entries are as big as they get.  Since I didn't preserve the album, I do not have the opportunity to rescan the items for the book. 

Lesson learned: Scan your stuff at 300 dpi or higher and preserve the original treasures of historical significance.

Opt for simplicity

The other challenge is the conflicting color variance of the two photos with the handwritten entries and the baby bracelets. What could I do? 

I decided the best thing I could do was use the page elements to suggest that this was a girl baby, not a boy bay. The soft peach/pink was perfect. The colors are muted enough that they do not compete with the photos or the memorabilia. Finally, I created a journaling block that recorded the fun stories of my birth.

Sure the elements don't place nice visually with each other, however, the historical value of these memorabilia out weigh the conflicts. The accounts surrounding my birth in my mother's handwriting and the size comparison of my mother's bracelet and my infant arm band are great treasures. 

By opting for simplicity, I put the emphasis on the historical nature of these items.


You're not trying to win awards!

I keep looking at this page layout thinking, it's not my favorite or my best. I keep wanting to figure out what how to improve upon it. I could spend hours trying to make my page 'award worthy'. If I did, I'd lose the most important part of my project, to focus on the stories and photos. The design is the glue for my project but not the most important thing. Also, I want to actually complete my projects sometime within the next year. With that being said, I can focus on making something that is pleasant enough to accomplish my goals, even if it's not the next grand-prize scrapbook layout winner.

I hope my honesty will help you cut yourself some slack if your heritage scrapbooks are not  worthy of being in Creative Keepsakes Magazine. Trust me on this. Your family (your true audience) won't care! They'll love your work. 

No go create a scrapbook page. Then let me know how things went.

2 comments :

  1. That's IT -- I often get bogged down in that need to be "award-worthy" -- AS IF! No wonder it takes me so long.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Wendy! I am so glad feel the same way. Now.. for both of us, and others, to cut ourselves some slack and focus on the memories. The best awards are the book receivers to say, "I want ones of these!"

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