Heritage Scrapbooking: My Parents

Heritage scrapbook layout
My Parents: Tan & teal papers - Triple J Designs Sun Kissed;
Embellishments - Just Saskia The Birds & The Bees

In crafting a heritage scrapbook about myself, an important page to include would be a little tribute to the folks you gave me life. Throughout most of my growing up years, mom had her wedding photos readily available. The other photos were tucked away and rarely accessed, how truly sad. The additional photos are beautiful glimpses of my parents during their courtship. My father was so skinny! My mother actually tried to be fashionable. These two things changed quite a bit after I was born. If either were alive, I'd ask them more about it.  Regardless, I shared a brief story on my layout of how they met and when they married.

For the layout, I've selected three colors from my color palette so that the pages in the book coordinate with each other. The three I chose for the page, compliments the featured 1960s era photos. I love the brown paper on the outside of the layout. It has a lot of great texture and frames the remaining elements nicely. I was quite pleased with the increase in embellishments I used on this page. They still play a supporting role, yet there is enough to not be boring.

You may notice that this series of posts featuring layouts from my personal heritage scrapbook takes a different approach than previous books I've created featuring my parents and grandparents. Having completed my first heritage scrapbook that my family actually enjoys reading, I'm now prepared to work on the photo albums and stories of my own life.  This project will be chronologically organized. I'll leave the focal person approach to my children to summarize some day.


To learn what additional pages you should include in a family history scrapbook, purchase the eBook Family History Scrapbooking Simplified at Amazon.com. This series also features tips recommended from my other eBook Power Scrapbooking

Comments

  1. The brown paper makes me realize how much brown is in each photo -- even the grass is dry and brown-looking.

    I appreciate the links to other related topics. Since I discovered your blog only recently, this helps me find some good information quickly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are a lot of browns in the old photos, intentionally or in the printing process. Glad you like all the link-throughs. I was hoping someone would appreciate the effort!

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